Pakistan makes new working relationship offers to New US administration

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Pakistan makes new working relationship offers to New US administration

ISLAMABAD - Foreign Office on Thursday said that Pakistan is looking forward to work with the new US Administration to further strengthen the bilateral ties and resolve the Afghanistan issue.

Speaking at a weekly news briefing here, Foreign Office spokesperson Zahid Hafeez Chaudhri said Pakistan was looking forward to work with the new US Administration to further strengthen the bilateral ties to make it multi-faceted, sustainable and mutually beneficial.

“Pakistan wants to continue its partnership with the US to achieve peace, stability and prosperity in the region. Pak-US bilateral relationship has been a factor for regional peace and stability. We have achieved a lot by working together in the past,” he said.

Chaudhri said the continued engagement and coordination was even more compelling in the context of shared geo-political and security challenges.

“Both the countries have worked closely to achieve the shared objective of peace in Afghanistan. Pakistan appreciates the progress made by the Afghan peace process, emphasizing the need to further build on it,” he added.

The spokesperson said there was no military solution to the Afghan conflict. “An Afghan-led and an Afghan-owned political settlement is the best way to achieve lasting peace in the neighbouring country,” he said.

The spokesperson urged the international community including the new US Administration to take notice of grave human rights violations in Indian illegally occupied Jammu and Kashmir. He said India had unleashed a wave of terrorism in held Kashmir and should be pressurized to improve the human rights situation in the occupied territory and move towards its resolution as per the UN Security Council resolutions.

The spokesperson rejected the launch of Ayodhya mosque project in India, replacing historic Babri mosque, which was demolished by extremist Hindu mob comprising Sangh Parivar groups in 1992.