Is there any link between Coronavirus vaccine and the blood clotting?

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Is there any link between Coronavirus vaccine and the blood clotting?

Scientists at the Goethe University in Frankfurt have claimed to have found the cause behind the rare blood clots associated with COVID-19 vaccines of AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson (J&J).

German scientists have attributed adenovirus vectors to rare but serious blood clotting events. Both vaccines use adenovirus vectors which are cold viruses used to deliver genetic instructions for the spike protein of the SARS-COV-2 virus in the body. ------------------------------

The vaccines’ delivery system sends the DNA gene sequences of the spike protein into the cell nucleus instead of the cytosol fluid found inside the cell where the virus produces proteins.

Once the DNA gene sequence is delivered in the cell nucleus, certain parts of the spike protein split apart, creating mutant versions, which are unable to bind to the cell membrane where immunization takes place.

The floating mutant proteins are instead secreted by cells into the body, triggering rare but serious blood clots.

German scientists have suggested AstraZeneca and J&J modify the gene sequences of COVID-19 vaccines in a way that prevents spike proteins from splitting in the cell nucleus. ------------------------------

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The UK has recorded 309 cases and 59 deaths from the rare blood clots out of the 33 million people who received the AstraZeneca vaccine. 142 people out of 16 million recipients of the AstraZeneca vaccine have suffered the rare blood clots in Europe. In the US, 8 people out of the 7.4 million recipients of the J&J vaccine developed rare blood clots.

Many countries, mostly in Europe, have temporarily suspended the use of AstraZeneca and J&J COVID-19 vaccines after cases of rare blood clotting events came to light.

On the other hand, COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna use m-RNA technology. The vaccines’ delivery system sends the DNA gene sequences of the spike protein only in the cytosol fluid and not to the nucleus.

German scientists have also termed all mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines as ‘safe.’