Pakistan ranked as 22nd most powerful country in the World: US Report

Pakistan ranked as 22nd most powerful country in the World: US Report
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WASHINGTON – Pakistan has dropped two positions to 22 in the list of most powerful country in the world, leaving Singapore, Spain, and Brazil behind in a new global ranking.

As per the list <link> published by US News and World Report, an Amercian media house publishing since 1933, has placed the South Asian country at the 22nd spot.

The ranking is based on the influence of nation, political, economic and military power.

India is ranked 15th most powerful and 25th best country in the list, while Turkey is 14th most powerful and 36th best country ranking in the list. Pakistan

1. Military Force: Pakistan’s total military force is 919,000 with 637,000 active and 282,000 reserve force respectively. 2. Military Strength: 1,281 military aircraft, 2,182 combat tanks, and 197 naval assets. 3. Economy: The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in Pakistan is 1222.52 US dollars in 2017.

“Power has transferred between civilian and military governments in Pakistan’s federal republic over the years, fostering an environment of instability and corruption that has stunted the nation’s growth and development. The seventh-most populous country is also one of the youngest in the world, with the majority of citizens under age 22,” stated the report.

Overall Pakistan was ranked as the 74th Best Country in the world this year, with its power rankings falling by two places in the latest list. Last year, Pakistan was ranked as the 20th most powerful country.

The United States of America remains the most powerful country in the world, with Russia and China claiming the second and third spot respectively.

The 2018 Best Countries report and rankings are based on how global perceptions define countries in terms of a number of qualitative characteristics, impressions that have the potential to drive trade, travel, and investment and directly affect national economies. The report covers perceptions of 80 nations.

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