Momo: After the suicidal Blue Whale game, a new deadly game released prompting suicide among kids

Momo: After the suicidal Blue Whale game, a new deadly game released prompting suicide among kids
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*LONDON - After the suicidal Blue Whale game, a new deadly game has been released that has already taken the life of a 12-year-old girl.*

Last year a deadly game called the ‘Blue Whale Challenge’ made headlines as it forced the players to commit suicide after giving them many challenges. Similar to that, another disturbing game called ‘Momo’ has swept social media, mostly WhatsApp, which has got parents and authorities concerned.

As per *The Sun, *the game initiated on a Facebook group where members were challenged to contact ‘Momo’ by sending messages to an unknown number and are later harassed with disturbing images and violent messages, ordering them to follow grotesque orders, often involving posting images and videos of self-harm or suicide.

Recently, a 12-year-old girl committed suicide in Argentina with authorities claiming the game to have a possible connection, similar to how the Blue Whale challenge caused numerous suicides last year. The cops claimed to have unlocked the girl’s phone finding a video she filmed of herself shortly before she died.

The game ‘controller’ claims to know the player’s personal information and threatens them if they don’t follow orders. Currently, Argentinian officials are investigating the identity of the mysterious ‘controller’, reporting that the number is associated with an 18-year-old.

The game is tied to a disturbing picture of a woman with terrifying feature, ripped off from the work of a Japanese doll artist Midori Hayashi who is not associated with the game.

Though it isn’t clear what the game’s intentions are, but authorities warn that the unknown senders can be using it to steal data or encourage violence and suicide, as per *BBC. *Targeting mostly teenagers, the fatal challenge has already been reported in couple of countries including Mexico, US, Argentina, Germany and France.

The Cybercrime authorities have already started issuing advisories to protect their children from this challenge and have asked WhatsApp users not to contact unknown numbers or engage in chain messages.

Technology