Pakistan concerned over Indian acquisition of S-400 missile system; says it would destabilize strategic stability; lead to arms race

Pakistan concerned over Indian acquisition of S-400 missile system; says it would destabilize strategic stability; lead to arms race
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ISLAMABAD: Pakistan Friday expressed concern over Indian acquisition of S-400 missile system, through multiple sources and warned it would further destabilize strategic stability in South Asia and lead to a renewed arms race.

The Foreign Office Spokesman said Pakistan had proposed a Strategic Restraint Regime in the region following the May 1998 nuclear tests by both sides and advocated against the acquisition of BMD systems due to their destabilizing effect.

He said India was building a Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) System. "Indian rejection of this proposal forced Pakistan to develop capabilities which render any BMD system ineffective and unreliable. Pakistan remains fully confident of its ability to address threats from any kind of destabilizing weapon system," the spokesman said.

"We reiterate our commitment towards ensuring national defence in line with the policy of maintaining credible minimum deterrence and maintaining strategic balance in the region in the future as well," the statement said.

India earlier this month inked a US $5.43 billion deal for five advanced S-400 Triumf surface-to-air missile squad. The first deliveries were expected within two years.

According to news reports the missile system being acquired by India is the latest long-range antiaircraft missile and is designed to destroy aircraft, cruise and ballistic missiles, including medium-range missiles, and surface targets.

The system can hit aerodynamic targets at a range of up to 400 kilometers (249 miles) and tactical ballistic targets flying at a speed of 4.8 km/s (3 mi/s) at a distance of up to 60 kilometers (37 miles).

Such targets include cruise missiles, tactical and strategic aircraft and ballistic missile warheads. The system’s radars detect aerial targets at a distance of up to 600 kilometers (373 miles) and the system’s surface-to-air missiles can hit aerodynamic targets at altitudes of 10,000-27,000 meters and ballistic threats at altitudes of 2,000-25,000 meters.

APP

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