Afghan Taliban have made inroads into Afghan Military and Intelligence

Afghan Taliban have made inroads into Afghan Military and Intelligence
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KABUL - Questions have been raised in Afghanistan that how the Afghan Taliban have managed to gain entry into the heavily fortified police and Military compounds. Afghan Taliban have made inroads into the Afghan Military and Intelligence circles.

A day after the Paktia attack, which killed at least 41 people, officials are still busy trying to identify a number of victims killed in Tuesday’s deadly attack on the Gardez City Police Headquarters. 

Officials have said that it has also not been fully established exactly how the attackers managed to gain entry into the police compound.

While residents in the city are trying to resume life as normal, many have suffered severe losses financially. Buildings in the area also sustained serious damage during the twin car bombings. 

According to Nasir Almyar, head of the Gardez city chamber of commerce, “the businessmen have been affected by the attack”.

“The private sector has lost at least $700,000,” he said.   

TOLOnews reporter, Tamim Hamid, who visited the scene of the attack, said among the dead were at least four tribal elders. 

“Its been only a few minutes since we entered the compound and already passengers of a vehicle have been identified. They were four tribal elders who had wanted to see the provincial governor,” he said. 

“They are civilians, they are tribal elders. They are not Taliban, they have no links to government. They were impartial. They were four tribal elders,” said Abdullah, a tribal elder.

CEO Abdullah Abdullah meanwhile said: “This has been the biggest attack that has occurred so far. Other issues (about this attack) require further investigation.”

Tuesday’s attack started with two suicide vehicle bombings followed by a gun battle that lasted five hours – between at least seven Taliban insurgents and Afghan Commandos.

The insurgents that stormed the compound were reportedly wearing security forces uniforms. 

One commando, Esanullah Ghorzang, who was involved in Tuesday’s operation said: “We conducted two plans: one inside the area and another outside. We entered the area after we were ordered.”   

Government said on Tuesday night that the attack had been one of the largest ever against security forces in the country. However, questions have been raised as to how the insurgents managed to gain entry. 

Provincial council members meanwhile said at a press conference on Wednesday that the attack was unacceptable and that insurgents must have had help in terms of gaining entry into the compound. 

They also lashed out at security institutions and intelligence units for not preventing such attacks.

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