Pakistan decides to fully stand with Iran after US withdrawal from nuclear deal

Pakistan decides to fully stand with Iran after US withdrawal from nuclear deal
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ISLAMABAD - Pakistan has decided to fully stand with Iran after US withdrawal from the historic nuclear deal.

Pakistan foreign ministry statement issued here said ‘arbitrarily rescinding’ such agreements “will undermine confidence in the value of dialogue and diplomacy in the conduct of international relations and the peaceful resolution of disputes.”

Pakistan, the statement said: “believes that the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action represents a very good example of a negotiated settlement of complex issues, through dialogue and diplomacy.”

“We had welcomed the JCPOA when it was concluded and hope that all parties will find a way for its continuation, especially when the International Atomic Energy Agency has repeatedly verified Iran’s compliance,” it said.

On May 8, President Trump walked out of the agreement calling JCPOA a ‘horrible, one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made.’ Trump said he would work to find a ‘real comprehensive and lasting’ deal to tackle not only the Iranian nuclear program but its ballistic missile tests and activities across the Middle East. The US President warned that his country would re-impose economic sanctions that were waived when the deal was signed in 2015.

The sanctions would target industries mentioned in the deal, including Iran’s oil sector, aircraft manufacturers exporting to Iran and Iranian government attempts to buy US dollar banknotes. This is expected to hit major European and US companies. Some exemptions are due to be negotiated.

US National Security Adviser John Bolton said the European companies doing business in Iran will stop their activities within six months or they will have to face US sanctions.

The deal was agreed between Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council - the US, the United Kingdom, France, China and Russia - plus Germany. It was struck by Trump’s predecessor Barack Obama. The other member countries have not yet seconded Trump’s decision.

Foreign Policy